Measuring Arduino Internal Pull-up Resistors

The Arduino (and many other boards) have a very useful time-and-cost saving feature ideal for when you are working with buttons and switches – namely internal pull-up resistors on the GPIO pins which can be enabled / disabled at will in software. This means you don’t have to clutter your board up with pull-up resistors of your own for all the buttons and things, and also means they can be turned off and on to give your design much more flexibility. Continue reading

Making your boards unique on Linux

I don’t know about you, but I have a huge pile of different Arduino-like boards here. (I have so many because I need to test UECIDE with them – or that’s what I tell the “bank manager”). Many is the time I will have more than one of them plugged in to my computer. Often times I have programmed one of them with some code only to find it’s not worked – and why hasn’t it worked? Because I have had the wrong serial port selected in the IDE.

All the development boards fall into three categories, and those categories define what the name of the serial port is. On Linux that name isn’t fixed – they’re allocated on a first-come-first-served basis, and often at boot up the names of boards already attached change order. A bit of a pain. Continue reading

Fast, Efficient Data Storage on an Arduino

Logging data on an Arduino is very much a trivial every-day task. Connect an SD card, open a file, and start printing data to it.

For many people that is good enough. It results in nice easily readable (by us humans) data.

But it’s not fast. It’s not efficient. It’s perfectly fine for things like logging temperature every hour, or barometric pressure every 5 minutes, etc. But when you have large amounts of data to store very rapidly you have to think a little differently. Continue reading

Top 6 Things Every Engineer Needs

So many people starting out in electronics, especially beginning to dabble in the world of Arduino and similar boards, just don’t have the basic equipment to do the job properly. And not only that, they don’t even know what the basic equipment is.

So here’s a list of things you should have on your desk no matter if you have just got your first Arduino or if, like me, you are a seasoned veteran. Continue reading

Dragino-chipKIT-Yun Yum Yum…

My latest acquisition, the Dragino Yun Shield is actually quite a nice bit of kit. It’s the Linux portion of an Arduino Yun placed on a shield, so you can attach it to any board of your choosing.

It provides both a UART and an SPI connection to whatever it is plugged in to. And that includes chipKIT boards.

For those of you not familiar with the Arduino Yun, it’s a combination MIPS SoC (Atheros) like you get in most home WiFi routers coupled with an Atmel microcontroller (32U4). Personally I always felt it was such a shame that a board as cool as the Yun should be crippled with a piece of Atmel like that. But hey ho. And then the Dragino arrived and all was forgiven. Gone is the Atmel, and in its place is the lovely PIC32MX695F512L on a chipKIT WF32. Or any other chipKIT board of your choice that you should happen to be drooling over at the time. Continue reading